**A World Trade Organization dispute settlement panel found China has administered its tariff-rate quotas for wheat, corn, and rice inconsistently with its WTO commitments.

agweb.com reports, the panel found China’s TRQ administration is not transparent, predictable, or fair, and it ultimately inhibits TRQ fillings, denying U.S. farmers access to China’s grain market.

This report is the second significant victory for U.S. agriculture, and, together with the victory against China’s excessive domestic support for grains, will help American farmers compete on a more level playing field.

https://www.agweb.com/article/breaking-us-wins-dispute-over-chinas-grain-tariff-rate-quotas/?mkt/

**After months of diligent negotiations, the U.S. and China are nearing an end to trade talks and, instead of the less than substantive deal many are expecting, the markets could be surprised.

Sources tell Forbes, expect a smaller deficit and greater market access, more transparency, and a new system of enforcement.

Protecting Intellectual Property has always been a sticking point, but in March, China passed a foreign investment law to prohibit forced transfer of technology.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/randybrown/2019/04/18/us-china-trade-deal-will-be-more-substantial-than-expected/#4d9664df591f

**The International Trade Commission is out with an analysis of the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement that looks like an overall win for the U.S. farm sector.

Agrimarketing.com reports, the analysis says the USMCA will reform biotechnology and phytosanitary standards, but allows only "slight increases" in exports of some U.S. ag commodities.

In an ITC simulation considering only the market access provisions in the agreement, ag exports increased $435 million dollars and imports saw an $80 million hike.

https://www.agrimarketing.com/s/123318